Day in the Life of an environmental consultant – November 2017

Day in the Life of an environmental consultant – November 2017

November began with a meeting between staff from the Stour Internal Drainage Board and their contractors Rhino Plant to review the cutting of Shalmsford Street Dyke.

The dyke once supported white clawed crayfish and was a nursery ground for trout but has become degraded with silt covering gravels and an excess growth of watercress across the channel.
shalmsford street 2016

excess watercress in stream

These problems are exacerbated by high nitrate levels and poaching of channel banks by livestock. Sheep stand in the channel to graze the watercress causing further poaching and nutrient enrichment.

Fencing would be one solution but landowners often don’t want the expense. Fencing can also cause problems for rivers if the fence line is too close to the channel edge and prevents bankside management. When this happens river banks can begin to scrub up creating dark channels which are impossible to manage.

During the meeting we looked at ways the cutting of the channel could help alleviate the situation. Narrow channels are often faster flowing with better oxygen levels and less silt drop out but this needs to be balanced against flood risk.

We decided that parts of Shalmsford Street will be cut manually which creates less disturbance to the channel bed and can give a more sinuous cut working with the natural processes of the river while other parts will be machine cut in order to create more open conditions to allow for winter water levels.

A further meeting took place with the IDB and EA in the middle of the month to talk about improvements to Buxford Dyke, near Ashford. Again poaching by livestock is causing issues here, pushing banks and silt into the river where it can cover gravels. Other sections of this channel are prone to drying out and there is potential to create off line ponds which could provide refuge for macro invertebrates during drought periods. Further discussions are needed with landowners before work can take place.4 cattle crossing leading to nitrate problems (2)

November also saw the annual IDB AGM where I gave a presentation to the board on the work we have completed in the last year and some of the challenges we face including managing invasive species on Chislet marshes and deciding which IDB channels to reduce maintenance on as we take on management of main river channels as part of the Environment Agency Rationalisation programme.

The Rationalisation Project looks at changing the status of some of our main rivers downgrading some of the smaller channels to Ordinary Watercourses. This would allow the Environment Agency to reduce the cost of its maintenance programme.

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Lampen Stream is a channel which could be transferred to IDB management

It is proposed that the downgraded rivers are managed by the Internal Drainage Boards, whose costs are met by landowners who pay drainage rates for the channels to be managed. Several areas have been chosen to trial the project and the River Stour board is potentially one of the pilot areas, chosen partially because of its good environmental track record.

As the River Stour Board takes on the maintenance of more kilometres of river then they need to reduce maintenance on channels they currently manage. One of my main areas of work at the moment is deciding which channels would most benefit from reduced maintenance.

This project offers great potential to improve habitat for species such as Shining Ramshorn snails who like rivers with more in-channel weed and I have been liaising with Kent Wildlife Trust to choose which ditches in areas like the Ash Levels would benefit the most. Other species prefer more open water habitat and here I have been talking to the County Plant Recorder to make sure that channels with species such as hair like pondweed continue to be managed on an annual basis.

tub wat drop close up

tubular water dropwort may benefit from reduced maintenance

This will create one of the biggest changes in the drainage district for many years but one which provides exciting opportunities for wildlife.

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Day in the life of an environmental consultant – October 2017

Day in the life of an environmental consultant – October 2017

October has been a busy month, working with farmers across Kent to improve marshland and rivers for wildlife.

The North Kent Breeding Wader project is gaining pace helped by a grant scheme administered by Kent Wildlife Trust. This funding scheme gives grants to landowners to undertake work on their land for the benefit of wetland wildlife. Almost all the farmers I worked with applied for the grant and, while the land is still dry, they have been busy creating scrapes, restoring rills, fixing pumps and improving water control.

Mid month I joined farmer Mr Wood and contractors Taylor Bros near Conyer to scrape back rush from an overgrown rill in order to create bare earth ideal for lapwings to feed on.

re-profiling rill 2017

Surveys carried out by KWT had shown there were no water vole present and so we could use the opportunity to create a shallow sloping edge. Good visibility is important for ground nesting birds so they can see and drive off predators. Crouching down at the water’s edge, I tried to look at the world from a lapwings point of view in order to get the correct bank profile.

This month also saw the completion of the first round of parrots feather removal from Chislet Marshes near Birchington on Sea. The River Stour Internal Drainage Board worked with Kentish Stour Countryside Partnership volunteers to remove every fragment of the plant from 500m stretches of the upstream reaches of three channels which the plant has colonised.

third task on Brooksend

Volunteers from KSCP search for Parrot’s feather on Chislet Marshes

In future years we hope to work slowly downstream pulling out the plant from the margins as it is hopefully eradicated from the upper reaches. This approach has been chosen so that we can remove the invasive without damaging other marginal flora .

White clawed crayfish enhancment visit pig stream

Officers from the EA and IDB discuss improvements for white clawed crayfish.

Lastly this month I met with white clawed crayfish experts from the Environment Agency to talk about management of channels which are proving strongholds for these endangered creatures. Working with the landowners and the IDB we hope to cut the weed from the channels in a way which will help maintain connectivity between isolated populations and add cobbles to the channel to give the crayfish places to shelter under.

A day in the life of an Environmental Consultant – July 2017

A day in the life of an Environmental Consultant – July 2017

Another crackingly busy month kicked off with surveying a ditch called Butterfly Cottage Dyke for the Internal Drainage Board.

A blisteringly hot day saw me putting the previous month’s Natural England training to

tubular water dropwort

Tubular Water Dropwort

good use by identifying the many species of rushes and sedges that grown along this botanically rich channel. The waterway supports rare plants such as Tubular Water Dropwort and Hairlike Pondweed. My work involves advising the Drainage Board on how to manage the channel to benefit these and other species and look at ways of improving its value for wildlife.

 
Unfortunately many of our waterways suffer from Nitrate and Phosphate pollution often caused by historically overloading the land with fertilisers. Agrochemicals are big business and firms have lobbied farmers for fifty years to buy them in order to achieve higher yields and cut down on ‘pest’ species. Often land is overburdened with chemicals and much ends up seeping through the soil and fertilising rivers and drainage ditches which then sprout lush growths of plants such as watercress which can impede flow and cause flooding.

the result of high levels of nitrate and phosphate

Excessive weed growth caused by chemical enrichment.

 
Over 8 years of surveying for the board I have also seen a change in land use with formerly grazed fields becoming fallow or cut for silage and more maize being grown. These changes are not good news for wildlife. Ditches alongside grazing marsh are often botanically rich as the action of animals grazing the channel opens up niches for wildlife while maize crops are often bad news next to rivers as after harvesting, the field is left with bare earth which can be washed into rivers in winter storms creating siltation issues which can lead to flooding.

 
Despite years of environmental subsidy schemes for farmers it seems that more needs to be done to tailor advise to farmers and put a healthy and wildlife rich countryside at the centre of farming policy not just tinker at the edges of farms and ignore the real issues.

 
However, the Internal Drainage Board are working to improve watercourses and this Ros and Hillers installing faggotsmonth I returned to Port Rill with volunteers from the Kentish Stour Countryside Partnership to finish installing woody debris in the channel. Fallen dead branches were pinned into place by the volunteers and should help create shallow marginal shelves along the edges of the channel while creating faster flow in the centre, cleaning gravels and creating oxygen rich water. This month we saw fish in this channel for the first time, a real testament to the volunteer’s efforts.

 
A month of river work finished with a survey of Pig Brook, another IDB managed channel which holds one of the last populations of White Clawed Crayfish. This native species is suffering through the spread of Crayfish plague spread from imported signal crayfish as well as pollution and silt covered gravels.

white clawed crayfish
Earlier in the month I had given a talk to the drainage board’s contractors Rhino Plant on the importance of biosecurity and the need to check clean and dry equipment and spray with a specialised Iodine based spray when working on crayfish channels. presentation for Rhino plant
Pig Brook is an attractive channel set in parkland but more could be done to improve the stream for crayfish and connect it with the surrounding floodplain. Next month I hope to work on plans to enhance the river and allow the crayfish to thrive.