Happiness is….a new garden visitor

goldfinches-in-the-gardenHurrah, hurrah, hurrah, goldfinches in the garden. I knew there was some reason I hadn’t cut down that bloody huge teasel plant.

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One Wild Winter – Handbags at dawn

two-robins-in-snowYou know it’s cold when two robins tolerate such close proximity under the bird table. They jerkily hop around each other with a wary eye. They remind me of two blokes in the pub who keep calling each other ‘mate,’ while squaring up for a fight. It ends, as such things so often do, with a quick spat in the neighbours garden before both parties withdraw to brood in the hedgerow.

Learning how to sing

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Today I witnessed a starling singling lesson. An adult sat on my tv aerial and ran through it’s repertoire of clicks and whistles while a youngster sat two doors down attempting to imitate but producing little more that some scratchy squeals. The adult tried again, talking in the most animated fashion about, I guess, the sky, the weather, the amount of craneflies to eat and where to find them. He stopped and stared at the youngster as if to say, “go on then, you’re turn.”

After a moment the youngster began, quietly whispering a little ditty, like a shy teenager on a school stage on speech night. Then both fell quiet, contemplating perhaps that a few more lessons were going to be needed.

Dawn on the Isle of Sheep

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In the midst of six days of 4.30am wake up calls as I head out for the first round of breeding wader surveys on the marshes of Sheppey, the isle of sheep. The early start means I am like a bear with a sore head by midday but, believe me, I never for one moment doubt how lucky I am that this is my day job. Marsh harriers, plummeting lapwing, beautiful sunrises and on Monday my first swallow of the year, flying across Capel Fleet.

A year in the life of an environmental consultant – February 2016

water and grazing machines. The key ingredients in encouraging lapwing.

water and grazing machines. The key ingredients in encouraging lapwing

February Fill Dyke is written into farming law. If your ditches are not full of water in February, so the saying goes, then it’s unlikely they will be. Full dykes, wet fields, short grass, that was what we were looking for as we returned to the farms receiving stewardship funding to manage the land for the benefit of breeding waders.

After a winter of meeting landowners and working with  Natural England and the RSPB it was heartening to see how good the majority of sites were looking. Wet splashes and tussocky grass lead to insect rich pasture which should attract and support more breeding birds this spring.

It is six weeks until the survey season starts but, due to the positive attitude of the farmers and the flexibility of Natural England and the RSPB, who are supporting this project, then things are looking hopeful.

February is also a traditional time of year to do hedgelaying. A weekend training course run by Alan Sage of AJS Crafts gave all those taking part an appreciation of the sheer physicality and skill needed to create a well laid hedge. Although mainly now used for decoration, hedge laying produces a stock proof barrier and can be cost affective as, once laid, the hedge can be left unmanaged for 15 years. They are also an asset to the countryside which is more than can be said for the ugly, split, flailed hedges that line our country roads at this time of year.

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freshly pleached hedge. Cutting the hedge in this way allows new shoots to grow.

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The hedge is staked and woven with long flexible rods known as binders.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The month finished by working with Oxney Land Services on Iwade Stream. Funded by the Medway and Swale Estuary Partnership we undertook some selective tree removal on an overly shaded section of the channel. Removal of ivy clad trees and low branches should allow more sunlight to reach the water and encourage the growth of marginal plants. Water vole and water rail live in this section of channel so more bankside cover should benefit these species.

oxney at work on Iwade streamoxney in action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Always another fight.

Always another fight.

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Burntwick Island, a great place to land a sea plane……Not!

I feel these days there is a never ending stream of battles to fight. No sooner do you breathe a small sigh of relief at the squashing of one scheme poised to damage the places you love then another comes along. It wears you down, but I guess that’s the point.

On Thursday by accident I hear of a proposal to begin a sea plane business in the Medway Estuary. The guy shows me the map of where the planes are planning to land, between the breeding tern colony on Burntwick Island and the RSPB reserve of Normarsh. This area is a RAMSAR site rightly protected as one of the most important places for breeding and overwintering waders and wildfowl in the country.  Peel Ports are running a consultation I am told but I am amazed that the proposals have even reached this stage.

I call my friends, Medway Swale Estuary Partnership, the RSPB, Countryside professionals in Medway Council. None of them have heard of these plans. So just who is being consulted?

Having raised the alarm things swing into action. The conservation bodies who protect this area begin to add their voices to the consultation.

“Well done you, for making people aware of this,” my friend says before going on to tell me that a development company have just won their appeal to build on the site at the end of my road.

Bakersfield is a scrubby brownfield site chocha block with songbirds, including nightingales, orchids and reptiles. McCulloch Homes’ original planning application had been thrown out by Medway Council as the site is just too valuable for wildlife but now the developers have won on appeal because the council isn’t meeting the government’s demands for housing at a quick enough pace.

I had protested against these plans, breathed a sigh of relief when they were dropped and now I have to swing into action to protest again. I do so, writing to Buglife, to the council, to my MP but it is exhausting, it is time consuming, it is never ending. It is designed to grind you down and make you stop saying ‘No.’ But saying No is still our right, it is the most important thing we can do. While I still live in some semblance of a democracy I will keep going. Raise awareness, protest, say no. giving in is not an option.

To contribute to the consultation for sea planes landing in the Medway Estuary contact james.goodfellow@peelports.com

To protest against the planned development at Bakersfield contact planning.representation@medway.gov.uk