Learning how to sing

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Today I witnessed a starling singling lesson. An adult sat on my tv aerial and ran through it’s repertoire of clicks and whistles while a youngster sat two doors down attempting to imitate but producing little more that some scratchy squeals. The adult tried again, talking in the most animated fashion about, I guess, the sky, the weather, the amount of craneflies to eat and where to find them. He stopped and stared at the youngster as if to say, “go on then, you’re turn.”

After a moment the youngster began, quietly whispering a little ditty, like a shy teenager on a school stage on speech night. Then both fell quiet, contemplating perhaps that a few more lessons were going to be needed.

Thanks to all the writers

Thanks to everyone who came along on the nature writing workshop, it was great to have so many people and such beautiful weather. I am really looking forward to reading everyone’s work. I think my favourite moment was meeting Susan who was severely deaf but could hear the nightingale song I played as a listening exercise. It was lovely to hear about the memory it evoked of her mother. I should really thank the nightingale too. For those of you who have never heard a nightingale sing then please listen to this clip.