We’re going on a reptile hunt.

Common Lizard, Hambrook Marshes copyright Tim Dawson

Common Lizard, Hambrook Marshes
copyright Tim Dawson

The sun made a rare appearance after, seemingly, weeks of rain on Wednesday and I was tentatively hopeful that our planned reptile hunt across Hambrook Marshes and Bus Company Island in Canterbury might prove successful.

Andrew Wilkinson from Kentish Stour Countryside Partnership explained the need to monitor reptiles at Hambrook to get an idea if their management of the site was successful.

Andrew reptile hunting

Andrew reptile hunting

The big reveal

The big reveal

To begin with, things did not look hopeful. We poked around under a variety of tins, roofing felts and tiles on the steep former railway embankment seeing little more than a slug and a fat spider but then Andrew gave a shout. Unfortunately, by the time the rest of us had scurried over the common lizard had scarpered.

However, down in the meadows we had better luck and a common lizard posed helpfully on a tree stump while it was ‘papped’ by the long lenses of fellow volunteers, Chris and Tim.

'papping' a lizard

‘papping’ a lizard

The sun was warming up as we travelled to Bus Company Island, a hidden reserve tucked away in the meeting between two branches of the River Stour. The site hadn’t been managed for some time and we ploughed through thickets of nettle and bramble working our way around the site. However we struck lucky. Tentatively pulling back the first mat, we saw a field vole run for cover and further along encountered a beautiful young slow worm.

Slow Worm, Bus Company Island  copyright Tim Dawson

Slow Worm, Bus Company Island
copyright Tim Dawson

Tim, who had spent a childhood hunting reptiles in the quarries near his home, was particularly delighted, as he hadn’t seen one in years. However, sometimes nature wants payment for its pleasures as Tim was to find out when we ventured onto the boardwalk above the pond.

As we peered over the edge of the dipping platform we heard a loud crack. Me, Chris and Tim were all thrown sideways as the platform gave way beneath us and Tim vanished feet first into the muddy pond. We all grabbed each other and Jenny, who had sensibly remained on the bank, and hauled ourselves out. Tim emerged, with a boot full of mud and squelched back to his car. Reptile hunts, like bear hunts are never easy.

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